Weigh Stations (Click here for Canada)

United States

Alabama

An officer may require the measuring or weighing of truck or trailer.

Measurement may be conducted by portable or stationary scales.

Officer may order truck or trailer to stationary scales if within a distance of 5 miles.

Alaska

Trucks over 10,000 lbs. GVWR are required to stop.

Arizona

Any commodity shipped into the state is subject to inspection for agricultural pests.

Gross weight fees apply to trailers and semitrailers with GVW of 10,000 lbs. or less; motor vehicles or vehicle combination if used primarily for transporting passengers for compensation; a hearse or ambulance or similar vehicle used in conduct of a mortician

Arkansas

The following vehicles must stop at weight/inspection stations: (1) agricultural vehicles; (2) passenger or specialty vehicles, whether single or in combination (towing a trailer) with GVWR of 10,000 lbs. or more; (3) commercial trucks with GVWR of 10,000 lbs. or more.

California

Every driver of a commercial vehicle shall stop and submit the vehicle to an inspection of the size, weight, equipment, and smoke emissions of the vehicle at any location where members of the California Highway Patrol are conducting tests and inspections of commercial vehicles and when signs are displayed requiring the stop.

Colorado

Every owner or operator of a motor vehicle having a manufacturer’s gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of over 26,000 lbs. shall secure a valid clearance from an office of the DOR, from an officer of the Colorado State Patrol, or from a port of entry weigh station before operating such vehicle or combination of vehicles in the state.

Connecticut

All commercial motor vehicles are required to stop.

Delaware

The Secretary of the DPS may adopt such regulations and procedures as may be necessary for law enforcement weighing purposes.

District of Columbia

N/A.

Florida

The following vehicles must stop: (1) agricultural, motor vehicles (including trailers) which are or could be used in the production, manufacture, storage, sale, or transportation of any food product or any agricultural, horticultural or live stock product, except private passenger automobiles with no trailer in tow, travel trailers, camping trailers, and motor homes; (2) any commercial vehicle (a) with a GWR of 10,000 lbs. or more, (b) designed to transport more than 10 passengers, or (c) used to transport hazardous materials.

Georgia

The following vehicles must stop: (1) agricultural vehicles; (2) passenger or specialty vehicles, either single or in combination (towing a trailer) with GVWR of 10,000 lbs. or more; and (3) commercial trucks with GVWR of 10,000 lbs. or more.

Hawaii

Trucks over 10,000 lbs. GVWR must stop.

Idaho

10 fixed ports of entry, 10 roving units.

Illinois

A police officer may pull over any vehicle suspected of exceeding weight limits.

Indiana

All trucks with a Gross Vehicle Weight Rating of 10,000 lbs. or more must stop.

Iowa

Any peace officer having reason to believe that the weight of a vehicle and load is unlawful is authorized to require the driver to stop and submit to a weighing of the same by means of either portable or stationary scales and may require the vehicle to be driven to the nearest public scales. If the officer determines that the weight is unlawful, the officer may require the driver to stop the vehicle in a suitable place until such portion of the load is removed as may be necessary to reduce the GVW to the permitted limit.

All vehicles weighing over 10,000 lbs. must stop.

Kansas

 All vehicles registered as trucks are required to stop at motor carrier safety and weight inspection stations when signs direct them to do so.

Any police officer having reason to believe that a vehicle or combination of vehicles is exceeding the legal weight limit may require the driver to stop and submit to a weighing of the vehicle by means of either portable or stationary scales.

Kentucky

Vehicles transporting agricultural products and all commercial vehicles with GVW rating of 10,000 lbs. or more must stop.

Louisiana

The following vehicles must stop: (1) agricultural vehicles; (2) passenger or specialty vehicles, either single or in combination (towing a trailer) with GVWR of 10,000 lbs. or more; (3) commercial trucks with GVWR of 10,000 lbs. or more.

Maine

A trailer exceeding 2,000 lbs. must be registered on the basis of gross weight.

Maryland

The Department of State Police maintains 7 vehicle weighing and measuring stations, with 1 station on Interstate 95.

The following vehicles must stop: (1) agricultural vehicles over 10,000 lbs.; (2) all commercial vehicles over 10,000 lbs.; (3) commercial buses carrying over 16 passengers; (4) any hazardous material haulers requiring placards.

Massachusetts

The following vehicles must stop: (1) agricultural vehicles; (2) passenger or specialty vehicles, either single or in combination (towing a trailer) with GVWR of 10,000 lbs. or more; (3) commercial trucks with GVWR of 10,000 lbs. or more.

Michigan

The following vehicles must stop: (1) vehicles with dual rear wheels transporting agricultural products; (2) trucks over 10,000 lbs. with dual rear wheels and/or towing construction equipment; (3) all tractor/semitrailer combination vehicles.

Minnesota

All vehicles with a GVW rating in excess of 10,000 lbs. must stop.

Mississippi

The State Tax Commission, tax collectors, highway patrol, or another authorized enforcement officer, shall have a right to weigh or have weighed any vehicle to ascertain the accuracy of registration.

Missouri

All commercial trucks licensed with a GVWR of over 18,000 lbs. must stop.

Montana

Vehicles transporting agricultural products and trucks with a GVW of 8,000 lbs. or more and new or used RVs being transported to a distributor or dealer must stop.

Nebraska

All trucks over 1 ton must stop, except a pickup truck pulling a recreational trailer.

Nevada

The following vehicles must stop: (1) agricultural; (2) passenger or specialty vehicles either in combination (towing a trailer) with GVWR of 10,000 lbs. or more; and, (3) commercial trucks with a GVWR of 10,000 lbs. or more.

New Hampshire

The driver of every motor vehicle shall, upon request of any law enforcement officer, stop and submit such to a weighing of said motor vehicle by means of either portable or stationary scales. If such scales are not available at the place where the stopping occurs, upon request of a law enforcement officer, the driver shall drive said motor vehicle to the nearest public scales provided the distance to the public scales does not exceed 10 miles.

New Jersey

New Jersey requires all vehicles that weigh 10,001 lbs or more to weigh.

New Mexico

Trucks with a GVWR of 26,001 lbs. or more must stop.

New York

State has fixed inspection/weigh stations along with random enforcement through use of portable units.

North Carolina

The DOT operates between 6 and 13 permanent weighing stations.

A law enforcement officer may stop and weigh a vehicle to determine if the vehicle’s weight is in compliance with the vehicle’s declared gross weight and weight limits.

North Dakota

All vehicles with a GVWR in excess of 10,000 lbs. must stop. Exception: recreational vehicles used for personal, recreational purposes.

Ohio

All commercial vehicles over 5 tons (10,000 lbs) are required to cross the scales if the weigh station is open in Ohio.

Oklahoma

Any officer of DPS, the Oklahoma Tax Commission, or any sheriff is authorized to stop any vehicle in order to weigh the vehicle with portable or stationary scales.

Oregon

All vehicles or combination of vehicles weighing 26,000 lbs. must stop.

Pennsylvania

Regardless of size, the following vehicles are subject to inspection and weigh station examinations: (1) agriculture vehicles when using public highways; (2) passenger and specialty vehicles towing large trailers; (3) large recreational vehicles, and (4) trucks.

Rhode Island

Agricultural vehicles and trucks with a gross vehicle weight rating over 10,000 lbs. must stop.

South Carolina

If the Department has reason to believe that the weight of a vehicle and load is unlawful, it may require the driver to stop and submit to a weighing of the vehicle and load either by means of portable or stationary scales and may require that the vehicle be driven to the nearest public scales.

Whenever an officer upon weighing a vehicle and load determines that the weight is unlawful, he may require the driver to stop the vehicle in a suitable place and remain standing until the portion of the load necessary to reduce the axle weight, or gross weight of the vehicle, or both, is removed.

All material unloaded must be cared for by the owner or operator of the vehicle at his own risk. The scaled weights of the gross weight of vehicles and combinations of vehicles cannot be closer than 10% to the true gross weight.

South Dakota

The following trucks must stop: (1) agricultural vehicles with a GVW rating over 8,000 lbs.; (2) trucks over 8,000 lbs.; (3) drive-away operations in excess of 8,000 lbs. GVW rating.

Tennessee

Placed statewide, checking federal and state restrictions related to size and weight, safety, and drivers regulations.

Texas

All commercial vehicles must stop when directed by sign or police officer.

Utah

Any peace officer having reason to believe that the height, width, length, or weight of a vehicle and its load is unlawful may require the operator to stop the vehicle and submit to a measurement or weighing of the vehicle and load. A peace officer may require the vehicle to be driven to the nearest scales or port-of-entry within 3 miles.

Vermont

Any uniformed police officer, having reason to believe that the weight of the vehicle and load is unlawful, may stop such motor vehicles up to one hour for the purpose of determining the weight of said vehicle and load. If the operator does not wish to submit to the weighing of such vehicle and load by means of portable scales he or she may demand that such vehicle be weighed at the nearest public scales reasonably available, however, if public scales are not reasonably available, the officer may require the vehicle to be weighed on portable scales.

Virginia

Trucks must stop if their registered gross weight exceeds 7,500 lbs.

Washington

Agricultural vehicles and trucks with a GVWR over 10,000 lbs. must stop.

West Virginia

A police officer or motor carrier safety enforcement officer may require that the driver of a vehicle or combination of vehicles stop and submit to a weighing with a portable or stationary weighing device, or to drive to the nearest weighing station if within a distance of 2 miles from where vehicle is stopped.

Wisconsin

Trucks over 8,000 pounds gross vehicle weight must stop.

Wyoming

Trucks are required to stop when instructed by a regulatory sign (black letters on a white background) or a police officer. Trucks and drivers are chosen for inspection on a random basis.

All oversize and overweight (150,000 lbs. or more) loads must have a permit in hand, or permission to enter the state in order to purchase a permit, before entering Wyoming or operating on Wyoming roads.

Puerto Rico

Every heavy motor vehicle that travels on the highways of Puerto Rico shall follow the instructions of the traffic signs and signals related or associated to the weighing process of trucks in the permanent weighing stations.


Canada

Alberta

Peace officer may require the operator of a motor vehicle to submit the vehicle together with its equipment and trailer, if any, to examination and tests to determine that the equipment and trailer are fit and safe for operation.

British Columbia

Commercial vehicles, agricultural vehicles, and buses over 5,500 kg must stop at inspection stations as directed. Before entry into the province, commercial vehicle operators must call the permit line (1-800-559-9688) and obtain a nonresident vehicle permit (temporary license) if they are not licensed for travel in BC under an inter-jurisdictional licensing agreement.

Manitoba

A peace officer may require the operator of any vehicle to submit to a vehicle weighing by driving to a weigh station or by using a portable scale.

New Brunswick

When directed by a traffic control device or sign on the highway, or when ordered by a peace officer, the operator of the specified vehicle must drive the vehicle to the location of the massing station or scales and submit the vehicle to a weighing.

Newfoundland and Labrador

An inspector can stop a vehicle by placing a sign on the roadway ordering all vehicles or all vehicles of a certain class to stop for weighing, by signaling the driver to stop the vehicle, or by ordering the driver to drive the vehicle to the nearest weigh station. This weigh station must be within 16 kilometers of where the vehicle was stopped. The driver must perform all other acts that the inspector requires or considers necessary for weighing the vehicle and its load.

Where the maximum gross mass or the axle mass of the vehicle exceeds that permitted by the regulations or by a sign applicable to that portion of the highway on which the vehicle was stopped, the inspector may order the driver of the vehicle to remove as much of the load as is necessary to bring the maximum gross mass or the axle mass of the vehicle within the mass permitted on that portion of the highway.

Northwest Territories

There are two weigh stations in the Northwest Territories: one in Enterprise and one six miles south of Inuvik. There are also two self weigh stations located in Fort Smith and Hay River. Highway Transport Officers are equipped with portable scale units.

Nova Scotia

All vehicles over 3,000 kg (6,613 pounds) registered weight must stop.

Nunavut

Local municipal councils may provide for the establishment and operation of weigh scales and the weighing of vehicles operated on a highway.

Ontario

All commercial vehicles must stop.

Prince Edward Island

Agricultural vehicles and trucks over 3,000 kg GVW must stop.

Quebec

Trucks with a GVWR of 4,500 kg or more and combination road vehicles where the GVWR of one of the vehicle is 4,500 kg or more must stop at weigh stations. Exceptions: vehicles used for recreational purposes and trucks with a net weight of 4,000 kg or less registered as a passenger vehicles.

Saskatchewan

All trucks over 10 metric tons must stop, except 2- and 3-axle Saskatchewan registered farm trucks.

Yukon

All vehicles over 9,000 kg must stop.