Move Over Law (Click here for Canada)

United States

Alabama

State law requires drivers approaching stationary emergency vehicles that are displaying flashing lights, including wreckers, traveling in the same direction, to vacate the lane closest if safe and possible to do so, or to slow to at least 15mph less than the posted speed limit.

Alaska

State law requires drivers approaching stationary emergency vehicles that are displaying flashing flights, including tow trucks, traveling in the same direction, to vacate the lane closest if safe and possible to do so, or to slow to a speed reasonable and prudent for traffic, road, and weather conditions.

Arizona

State law requires drivers to reduce speed and, if safe to do so, vacate the lane closest to any stationary vehicles with flashing or warning lights, including emergency vehicles and tow trucks.

Arkansas

State law requires drivers approaching stationary emergency response vehicles that are displaying flashing lights, including wreckers or tow vehicles, traveling in the same direction, to move to the farthest lane from the vehicle if safe and possible to do so, or to slow to a speed appropriate for road and weather conditions.

California

State law requires drivers to slow down and vacate the lane closest to a stationary emergency response vehicle flashing emergency lights if safe to do so. This includes tow trucks and Caltrans vehicles if displaying flashing amber warning lights.

Colorado

State law requires drivers approaching stationary emergency vehicles that are displaying flashing lights, including tow trucks, traveling in the same direction, to vacate the lane closest, if safe and possible to do so, or to reduce to a speed safe for weather, road, and traffic conditions.

Connecticut

State law requires drivers approaching one or more stationary emergency vehicles, including tow trucks, traveling in the same direction, to reduce speed and, if safe and reasonable to do so, vacate the lane closest to the stationary vehicle.

Delaware

When approaching a stationary emergency vehicle or tow truck with flashing lights, motorists traveling in the same direction are required to move to a lane not adjacent to the vehicle and reduce speed.

District of Columbia

The District of Columbia has no move over law.

Florida

State law requires drivers to reduce speed to 20mph less than the posted speed limit and, if safe to do so, vacate the lane closest to stationary emergency vehicles, including towing and recovery vehicles, when traveling in the same direction. If such movement cannot be safely accomplished, the driver shall reduce speed.

Georgia

State law requires drivers approaching stationary emergency vehicles displaying flashing lights, including towing and recovery vehicles, traveling in the same direction, to vacate the lane closest if safe and possible to do so, or slow below the posted speed limit to a speed reasonable for road and traffic conditions.

Hawaii

State law requires drivers approaching stationary emergency vehicles displaying flashing lights, including tow trucks, to vacate the lane closest if safe and possible to do so (and if possible move two lanes over), and slow to a speed that is safe, reasonable, and prudent.

Idaho

State law requires drivers traveling in the same direction to slow down and vacate the lane closest to a stationary emergency vehicle displaying flashing lights if safe to do so. This includes tow trucks, wreckers, and other recovery vehicles.

Illinois

State law requires drivers approaching stationary emergency vehicles displaying flashing lights, including towing and recovery vehicles, traveling in the same direction, to vacate the lane closest if safe and possible to do so, or slow to a safe speed.

Indiana

State law requires drivers approaching a stationary emergency vehicle displaying flashing lights, including towing and recovery vehicles, traveling in the same direction, to vacate the lane closest if safe and possible to do so, or reduce speed at least 10mph below the speed limit.

Iowa

State law requires drivers approaching a stationary emergency vehicle displaying flashing lights, including towing and recovery vehicles, traveling in the same direction, to vacate the lane closest if safe and possible to do so, or slow to a reasonable speed for road and traffic conditions.

Kansas

State law requires drivers approaching a stationary emergency vehicle displaying flashing lights, including towing and recovery vehicles, traveling in the same direction, to vacate the lane closest if safe and possible to do so, or slow to a speed safe for road, weather, and traffic conditions.

Kentucky

State law requires drivers approaching a stationary emergency vehicle displaying flashing lights, including towing and recovery vehicles, traveling in the same direction, to vacate the lane closest if safe and possible to do so, or slow to a speed safe for road, weather, and traffic conditions.

Louisiana

State law requires drivers approaching any stationary emergency vehicle displaying flashing lights, not including tow trucks, traveling in the same direction, to vacate the lane closest if possible to do so, or slow to a reasonably safe speed.

Minnesota

State law requires drivers traveling in the same direction to reduce speed and, if safe to do so, vacate the lane closest to stationary emergency vehicles using flashing lights, including towing and recovery vehicles and road maintenance vehicles.

Mississippi

State law requires drivers approaching a stationary emergency vehicle displaying flashing lights, including towing and recovery vehicles, traveling in the same direction, to vacate the lane closest if safe and possible to do so, or slow to a speed safe for road conditions.

Missouri

State law requires drivers approaching a stationary emergency vehicle displaying flashing lights, including towing and recovery vehicles, traveling in the same direction, to vacate the lane closest if safe and possible to do so, or slow to a speed safe for road conditions.

Maine

State law requires drivers approaching a stationary emergency vehicle displaying flashing lights, including towing and recovery vehicles, traveling in the same direction, to vacate the lane closest if safe and possible to do so, or to slow to a safe and reasonable speed.

Maryland

State law requires drivers traveling in the same direction and approaching a stopped emergency vehicle using flashing lights, effective October 1, 2014 including tow trucks, to change into a lane not immediately adjacent to the vehicle, if possible, or to slow to a speed safe for weather, road, and traffic conditions.

Massachusetts

Drivers traveling in the same direction and approaching a stationary emergency vehicle, highway maintenance vehicle, or tow or recovery vehicle with flashing lights must slow down to a safe speed and, if practicable, move to a non-adjacent lane.

Michigan

State law requires drivers approaching a stationary emergency vehicle displaying flashing lights, including towing and recovery vehicles, traveling in the same direction, to vacate the lane closest if safe and possible to do so, or to slow to a speed safe for weather, road and traffic conditions.

Montana

State law requires drivers approaching a stationary emergency vehicle displaying flashing lights, including towing and recovery vehicles, traveling in the same direction, to vacate the lane closest if safe and possible to do so, or slow to a safe speed. If on a highway with a speed limit 50mph or greater, the driver must slow by at least 20mph below the posted speed limit.

Nebraska

A driver approaching a stopped emergency vehicle, including tow trucks, with flashing lights and traveling in the same direction to vacate the lane closest to the vehicle or reduce speed and maintain a safe speed while passing the vehicle. If vacating the closest lane if not possible, a driver must slow to a safe speed.

Nevada

State law requires drivers traveling in the same direction to reduce speed and, if safe and possible to do so, vacate the lane closest to stationary emergency vehicles and tow vehicles displaying flashing lights.

New Hampshire

State law requires drivers approaching a crash or emergency area to slow to a safe speed and give wide berth to stationary emergency vehicles displaying flashing lights, including towing, recovery, and highway maintenance vehicles.

New Jersey

Motor vehicles approaching a stationary authorized emergency vehicle, tow truck, highway maintenance or emergency service vehicle and traveling in the same direction must move over to a non-adjacent lane if possible, or slow down.

New Mexico

State law requires drivers traveling in the same direction to reduce speed and vacate the lane closest to official emergency vehicles, not including tow trucks.

New York

Drivers traveling in the same direction must exercise due care, include moving from a lane immediately adjacent, and reducing speed, to avoid colliding with a vehicle parked, stopped, or standing on the shoulder or any portion of the highway when the vehicle is an authorized emergency response, tow truck, or maintenance vehicle with its lights flashing.

North Carolina

State law requires drivers approaching a stationary emergency vehicle displaying flashing lights, including towing and recovery vehicles, traveling in the same direction, to vacate the lane closest if safe and possible to do so, or slow to a safe speed.

North Dakota

State law requires drivers approaching a stationary emergency vehicle displaying flashing lights, including wreckers and highway maintenance vehicles, traveling in the same direction, to vacate the lane closest if safe and possible to do so, or slow to a safe speed.

Ohio

State law requires drivers approaching a stationary emergency vehicle displaying flashing lights, including road service vehicles, traveling in the same direction, to vacate the lane closest to if safe and possible to do so, or slow to a speed safe for road, weather, and traffic conditions.

Oklahoma

State law requires drivers approaching a stationary emergency vehicle displaying flashing lights, including wreckers, traveling in the same direction, to vacate the lane closest if safe and possible to do, or slow to a speed safe for road, weather, and traffic conditions.

Oregon

State law requires drivers approaching a stationary emergency vehicle displaying flashing lights, including roadside assistance and tow vehicles, traveling in the same direction, to vacate the lane closest if safe and possible to do so, or to reduce speed to at least 5 mph under the posted speed limit.

Pennsylvania

State law requires drivers approaching an emergency response area, including areas in which a tow truck is offering assistance, to pass in a non-adjacent lane if safe and possible to do so, or slow to a safe speed.

Rhode Island

State law requires drivers approaching a stationary emergency vehicle displaying flashing lights, including roadside assistance vehicles, traveling in the same direction, to vacate the lane closest if safe and possible to do so, and slow to a safe speed.

South Carolina

State law requires drivers to reduce speed and, if safe to do so, vacate the lane closest to stationary emergency vehicles, including tow trucks and recovery vehicles.

South Dakota

State law requires drivers to reduce speed and vacate the lane closest to official emergency vehicles, including tow trucks and wreckers.

Tennessee

State law requires drivers approaching a stationary authorized emergency or utility vehicle, including a tow truck or recovery vehicle, giving a signal by use of flashing lights and traveling in the same direction, to reduce speed and, if safe to do so, vacate the lane closest to the vehicles, or reduce to a speed safe for road conditions.

Texas

State law requires drivers approaching a stationary authorized emergency vehicle, including a tow truck and TX DMV vehicles and workers, using approved visual signals, and traveling in the same direction, to reduce speed (not to exceed 20 mph less than a posted speed limit of 25 mph or more, or not more than five mpg when the posted speed limit under 25 mph) and vacate the lane closest to the emergency vehicles.

Utah

State law requires drivers approaching a stationary authorized emergency vehicle, tow truck or highway maintenance vehicle displaying flashing lights, and traveling in the same direction, to reduce speed and, if safe to do so, vacate the lane closest to stationary vehicles.

Vermont

State law requires drivers approaching a stationary law enforcement vehicle, ambulance, fire fighting vehicle, a vehicle used in rescue operations, or a towing and repair vehicle displaying signal lamps, and traveling in the same direction, to reduce speed and, if safe to do so, vacate the lane closest to the stationary vehicles.

Virginia

State law requires drivers approaching a stationary vehicle, including a tow truck, that is displaying a flashing lights and traveling in the same direction to vacate the lane closest to the stationary vehicle if safe to do so, or slow to a speed safe for highway conditions.

Washington

State law requires drivers to vacate the lane closest to stationary emergency vehicles, including tow trucks, if they are traveling in the same direction and it is safe to do so. If not, drivers are required to slow down and may not exceed the speed limit within 200 feet before and after a stationary emergency vehicle that has its flashing lights activated.

West Virginia

State law requires drivers approaching and traveling in the same direction as a stationary authorized emergency vehicle, including a tow truck, that is flashing lights, to change to a non-adjacent lane if safe to do so, or to slow to no more than 15 mph on a non-divided highway or 25 mph on a divided highway.

Wisconsin

State law requires drivers traveling in the same direction and approaching an authorized emergency vehicle or roadside service vehicle, including a tow truck, that is displaying flashing lights and parked or standing on or within 12 feet of a roadway, to vacate the lane closest to the stationary vehicle, if safe to do so, and reduce speed.

Wyoming

State law requires drivers approaching an official stationary emergency vehicle making use of appropriate visual signals, not including tow trucks, to merge into the lane farthest from the vehicle when traveling in the same direction, if safe to do so, or to slow to a speed that is 20 miles per hour less than the posted speed limit.

Puerto Rico

N/A.


Canada

Alberta

A motorist may not drive more than 60 kph or the maximum speed limit, whichever is lower, if the vehicle is travelling on the same side of the highway and in the lane immediately adjacent as a stopped emergency vehicle or tow truck, and is passing the stopped emergency vehicle or tow truck when its flashing lamps are operating.

British Columbia

Drivers approaching a stopped emergency vehicle displaying flashing lights must slow down, and if traffic permits, move over into the adjacent lane in order to pass by.

Manitoba

Drivers approaching a stopped roadside assistance vehicle, including a tow truck, must slow down and pass the stopped vehicle only if safe to do so.

New Brunswick

Drivers approaching a stopped emergency vehicle equipped with at least one flashing red light must slow down, proceed with caution, and move to a non-adjacent lane, if possible.

Newfoundland and Labrador

Newfoundland and Labrador does not have a law specifically addressing the approach of stopped emergency vehicles, but does have a law against generally failing to yield to emergency vehicles.

Northwest Territories

A driver must reduce his speed to half the posted speed limit when passing within 120m of a stopped emergency or enforcement vehicle with lights flashing.

Nova Scotia

Drivers passing a stopped emergency vehicle with flashing lights must decrease speed to the speed limit or 60 kph, whichever is less, and must vacate the lane closet to the stopped vehicle, if safe to do so.

Nunavut

No requirement to slow down and/or move to an adjacent lane when passing stopped emergency vehicles.

Ontario

Upon approaching an emergency vehicle that is stopped on a highway with its emergency lights activated, the driver of a vehicle travelling on the same side of the highway shall slow down and proceed with caution and move to a non-adjacent lane if it is safe to do so.

Prince Edward Island

Drivers passing a stopped emergency vehicle with flashing lights must decrease speed to lesson more than half the posted speed limit, and must vacate the lane closest to the stopped vehicle, if safe to do so.

Quebec

Upon approaching an emergency vehicle, including a tow truck, that is stopped on a highway with its emergency lights activated, the driver of a vehicle travelling on the same side of the highway shall slow down and proceed with caution and move to a non-adjacent lane if it is safe to do so.

Saskatchewan

Prohibits driving greater than 60kph while passing highway workers or equipment, emergency vehicles stopped with emergency lights flashing, and tow trucks stopped with amber lights flashing, road construction vehicles with lights flashing, and distinctively lit Ministry of Highways vehicles.

Yukon

Yukon has no Move Over law.